Where does Yorkshire pudding come from?

If you guessed Yorkshire, you’re partly right. This sort of open-pan pudding made with meat drippings has been popular in Britain since at least 1737 when the first recipe was published by “a Lady” in her seminal book, The whole duty of a woman, or, An infallible guide to the fair sex: containing rules, directions, and observations, for their conduct and behavior through all ages and circumstances of life, as virgins, wives, or widows : with rules and receipts in every kind of cookery . I need to get a copy of that for the missus for Christmas. Think?

Here it’s important to point out that A. Lady’s recipe was only for a “dripping pudding”, not “Yorkshire” pudding. Indeed it seems that while pan puddings were prepared and consumed all over England around that time, those from Yorkshire were especially prized for their lightness and flavor. It was Hannah “The Hanoverian Hellraiser” Glasse who first coined the term in her 1747 classic The Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy, Which far exceeds any Thing of the Kind ever yet Published. It’s gone by that name ever since.

Or such is the authoritative word from Joe Pastry.com, Baking Techniques, History & Science, or, The Compleat Ravings of a Lunatic, Containing many Facts, Illustrations, Instructions, Receipts, Typographical Errata and Parenthetical Observations for the Amusement of the Curious or Inebriated.

Has a certain zing, I think.

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10 Responses to Where does Yorkshire pudding come from?

  1. Hayley says:

    There’s a video on YouTube showing the original recipe:

    http://youtu.be/7r_1Q3_LlTk

  2. Jen says:

    “Joe Pastry.com, Baking Techniques, History & Science, or, The Compleat Ravings of a Lunatic, Containing many Facts, Illustrations, Instructions, Receipts, Typographical Errata and Parenthetical Observations for the Enjoyment of Those Who are Curious of Mind or Inebriated”
    Now that’s a book I want for Christmas. Maybe next year for us, Squire?

  3. BrigittaV says:

    Nice title you’ve coined for your … er … blog? Book? Miscellanea? No, really. I like it.

    • joepastry says:

      I may be obligated to write something for print now, Brigitta, but it’ll have to be a thick book printed via letterpress and bound with twine and glue. Talk about “old media”! Kind of a fun idea, really.

      Cheers,

      - Joe

  4. Rachel says:

    Hahaha – I love it!

  5. rainey says:

    I thought “pudding” was British for dessert. How did this rich but not in the least sweet thing get called a pudding?

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